General information about model Mamod SE1

The mamod SE1 was first inroduced in 1936 as a Hobbies single cylinder engine with a flat base and a solid brass flywheel. It was a big smaller than the SE2 and a bit cheaper. Through the years the model got a raised base and the base mounted chimney was replaced by a boiler mounted chimney.In 1969 the model was renamed SE1A and got some modifications like a smaller safety valve.

In 1979 the model was discontinued.

Mamod SE1
I bought this engines on 5 November 2006 for 54.02 on ebay UK
I got the engine for a quite fair price since at exact the same time a auction for a SE4 engine was ending.

I liked to add this engine to my collection, since it's from the same time period as my SE2 and minor 2.
Mamod SE1
Mamod SE1


The engine was quite dirty when I got it, and there was solder around the water level plug.
Water level plug
Water level plug

Unfortunately with a first test run it turned out that there was quite some leaking around the water level plug, I couldn't get the engine to run, so this will be a nice restoration project.
 
Update 13-01-2008
It's been a while since I received this engine. In the months between then and now I've been busy restoring it. The most difficult part of the restoration was solving the problem of the leaking water level plug. For me this was the first time I had to solder on a engine, so with the advice of some of the very helpfull people on "The Unofficial Mamod and Other Steam Forum" I started to knock the boilers end cap off.
The engine in my soldering setup
The engine in my soldering setup

Here you see the boiler in the clamp contruction I've used to get it heated.
soldered out thread
soldered out thread

And here you see the end cap that's removed from the boiler together with the desoldered thread. Getting the end cap off wasn't as easy as it sounds. I thought I would only have to heat it to make it fall off, but the end cap was actually a tight fit, so you have to apply some force to get it off. I heated up the end cap a bit too much (actually got it red hot) and deformed it a little bit when I applied force to get it off. So if you ever have to do someting similar to this, don't get it red hot and apply some force to it with something like a piece of wood. You can see that it was a little deformed on this image:
boiler faceplate
boiler faceplate

and this is how the inside of a boiler looks:
Inside of the boiler
Inside of the boiler

Another usefull advice I got at the mamod forum was to also resolder the other two threads now that I had the boiler open anyway, because they might have gotten weak when I was soldering on the boiler. On the picture below you see the boiler with all the threads removed, you can actually see that it got so hot that the paint in the chimney burnt away.
stripped boiler
stripped boiler

After the boiler was stripped down like that, all I had to do was solder the theads back in. That was a lot more difficult than I expected. You have to solder the threads back in from the inside, using flux and solder, but there is not much room inside a boiler to get both your flame and the solder there, while also keeping the thread at the right place. The thread where the steam pipe is attached to was especially difficult, because it easily falls out while soldering. When I finaly got the threads where I wanted them my soldering work had become a mess.
Messy soldering
Messy soldering

Solder everywhere where it wasn't supposed to be, I thought I had to go and find a new boiler for this engine, but the people on the mamod forum told me that even this mess was cleanable. At least the engine now was steam tight. With a lot of sanding paper, going from low to high grades, and a lot of brasso polishing afterwards, I could indeed get a lot cleaned up.
the boiler after some sanding and polishing
the boiler after some sanding and polishing

Here you see the boiler after a lot of cleaning, and with the red paint back in the chimney. In the mean time I had also repainted the base plate and the firebox (althouh some might say I shouldn't have done that.) Now that the boiler was almost done, I started on the small bits that still needed polishing. One of them was the boiler strap, it was corroded quite a bit
Old boiler strap
Old boiler strap

I thought these would be all copper, and that I could just clean them up with brasso, but it turned out they are just metal, with some kind of copper plating (or paint) on it. Since I'm a bit of a perfectionist, I want to get these kind oif details good too. To replace the boiler strap I ordered a sheet of copper on ebay
Copper sheet
Copper sheet

The copper sheet is thicker than the original strap (0.5mm), but I was able to create this strap with it after a few attempt:
new boiler strap
new boiler strap

Because of the thickness of it it was a bit difficult to bend it the right way, If I have to make one again, I think I'll choose thinner copper. On the picture below you can see that it'n not perfect, but close enough for me
Boiler strap
Boiler strap

After that was done, the engine was finally ready
SE1 after restoration
SE1 after restoration

All it now needs is a mamod decal. Although the soldering job was a nightmare, it at least was a good learning experience The boiler still got the scars from my soldering performance, so if I ever see a good replacement on ebay or something, I might still change it. I would like to thank all of the people on The Unofficial Mamod and Other Steam Forum who helped me with this project for all the usefull hints and tips :)